Charlottesville: Donald Trump Condemns Violence As White Nationalists, Liberals Clash

Trump did not mention the KKK or white supremacists during Saturday remarks  

  • One person was killed after a car accelerated into a group of counter-protesters in Charlottesville just hours before his press conference 

  • Chaos has erupted in the city after white nationalists bearing tiki torches stormed the small college town for a planned 'Unite the Right' rally  

  • But most of Trump's remarks were about how 'well' America was performing

  • He also mentioned that the US was divided long before him or Barack Obama 

  • By Jenny Stanton For Dailymail.com

    Published: 18:01 BST, 12 August 2017 | Updated: 17:50 BST, 13 August 2017

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    Donald Trump has condemned the violence in Charlottesville - but is coming under fire for speaking about bigotry 'on many sides' and failing to denounce white nationalism. 

    The president was speaking minutes after it was announced that one person has died after being hit by a driver who accelerated into a crowd of counter-protesters in the Virginia city. 

    He said: 'We condemn this egregious display on bigotry and violence on many sides, it's been going on for a long time in our country.' 

    Trump also brought up his predecessor Barack Obama during the speech, saying that the United States has been divided for many years.  

    The president added: 'Not Donald Trump, not Barack Obama, it's been going on a long time.' 

    Police arrested James Alex Fields, 20, in connection with the deadly crash. Fields was charged with second-degree murder Saturday evening.

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    Donald Trump has condemned the violence in Charlottesville - but is coming under fire for speaking about bigotry 'on many sides' and failing to denounce white nationalism 

    Donald Trump has condemned the violence in Charlottesville - but is coming under fire for speaking about bigotry 'on many sides' and failing to denounce white nationalism 

    One person was killed and others were injured after a car rammed into a group of counter-protesters as white nationalists stormed Charlottesville, Virginia on Saturday  

    One person was killed and others were injured after a car rammed into a group of counter-protesters as white nationalists stormed Charlottesville, Virginia on Saturday  

    NBC reporter Hallie Jackson asked the White House what exactly Trump meant by 'on many sides', and it posted a statement on Twitter

    ‘The president was condemning hatred, bigotry and violence from all sources and all sides,’ the official said. 'There was violence between protesters and counter protesters today.' 

    Attorney Gen Jeff Sessions also failed to call on white supremacists. 

    'We stand united behind the President in condemning the violence in Charlottesville and any message of hate and intolerance,' he said in a statement. 

    'This violence is totally contrary to American values and can never be tolerated.'   

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    Trump also called for a 'swift restoration of law and order' in the small college town during his remarks, saying 'no child should be afraid of going out to play'. 

    The president said he had just gotten off the phone with Virginia Gov Terry McAuliffe and they agreed 'the hate and violence must stop now'. 

    'We must come together with love for our and true affection - and I say this strongly - for each other.' 

    Trump then went on a tangent about how the country was doing 'well in so many ways', referencing employment numbers and how 'companies are pouring into our country'. 

    'We're renegotiating trade deals to make them great for our country and great for the American workers, so many incredible things happening in our country.' 

    Trump did not call out white nationalists or the Ku Klux Klan during his remarks. Nor did he call the crash that left one dead an act of domestic terrorism 

    Trump did not call out white nationalists or the Ku Klux Klan during his remarks. Nor did he call the crash that left one dead an act of domestic terrorism 

    The horrifying moment the car crashed into the large group was caught on camera  

    The horrifying moment the car crashed into the large group was caught on camera  

    There were several hundred people marching in a long line when the car drove into the group

    There were several hundred people marching in a long line when the car drove into the group

    'So when I watch Charlottesville to me it's very, very sad,' Trump added. 

    'Above else we must remember this truth, no matter or color, creed religion or political party, we are all Americans first.' 

    'We love our country, we love our god, we love our flag, we’re proud of our country, we’re proud of who we are.' 

    'So we want to get this situation straightened out in Charlottesville. And we want to study it and we want to see what we’re doing wrong as a country where things like this can happen.' 

    Trump did not call out white nationalists or the Ku Klux Klan during his remarks. Nor did he call the crash that left one dead an act of domestic terrorism. 

    Trump was swiftly denounced on Twitter for failing to denounce the white supremacists in Charlottesville or even reference racism or antisemitism in connection with the violence

    Trump was swiftly denounced on Twitter for failing to denounce the white supremacists in Charlottesville or even reference racism or antisemitism in connection with the violence

    KKK leader David Duke previously said on Saturday that the white supremacist demonstrators were 'fulfilling the promises of Donald Trump'. 

    'That's what we believed in, that's why we voted for Donald Trump. Because he's going to take our country back,' he said. 

    James Alex Fields (pictured), 20, was arrested and charged with second-degree murder Saturday evening 

    James Alex Fields (pictured), 20, was arrested and charged with second-degree murder Saturday evening 

    Earlier on Saturday the president reiterated that 'all' Americans needed to unite and 'condemn all that hate stands for'.  

    'There is no place for this kind of violence in America. Lets come together as one!,' he tweeted.  

    'Am in Bedminster for meetings & press conference on V.A. & all that we have done, and are doing, to make it better-but Charlottesville sad!' 

    The First Lady was first to speak out against the rally, which saw white nationalists waving Nazi flags and sporting shirts with Hitler quotes on the UVA campus.  

    'Our country encourages freedom of speech, but let's communicate w/o hate in our hearts,' she tweeted. 'No good comes from violence. #Charlottesville.' 

    Violence erupted ahead of a planned rally where thousands of white nationalists were expected to gather for an alt-right protest.

    Two people were seriously injured in the clash, Virginia State police reported. 

    It was noted that Trump refused to discuss the alt-right groups even when directly asked by reporters during the press conference

    It was noted that Trump refused to discuss the alt-right groups even when directly asked by reporters during the press conference

    At least two people were seriously injured during a destructive clash between white nationalists and counter-protesters at Emancipation Park before the controversial Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday. A video appears to show the altercation, as a man is being dragged away while a woman screams: 'Don't allow them to do this!'

    At least two people were seriously injured during a destructive clash between white nationalists and counter-protesters at Emancipation Park before the controversial Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday. A video appears to show the altercation, as a man is being dragged away while a woman screams: 'Don't allow them to do this!'

    Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer has denounced the 'cowardly parade of hatred, bigotry, racism, and intolerance march down the lawns of the architect of our Bill of Rights' and warned for residents to stay away from the rally

    Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer has denounced the 'cowardly parade of hatred, bigotry, racism, and intolerance march down the lawns of the architect of our Bill of Rights' and warned for residents to stay away from the rally

    The First Lady was first in the Trump administration to speak out against the rally, which saw white nationalists waving Nazi flags and sporting shirts with Hitler quotes on the UVA campus 

    The First Lady was first in the Trump administration to speak out against the rally, which saw white nationalists waving Nazi flags and sporting shirts with Hitler quotes on the UVA campus 

    Nearly an hour after Melania Trump condemned the violence, Trump finally followed suit

    Nearly an hour after Melania Trump condemned the violence, Trump finally followed suit

    Trump, who is currently on vacation at Bedminster National Golf Club in New Jersey, remarked that the violence was 'sad' 

    Trump, who is currently on vacation at Bedminster National Golf Club in New Jersey, remarked that the violence was 'sad' 

    A video appears to show the altercation - a man can be seen being dragged away by officials while a woman screams: 'Don't allow them to do this!'

    Another woman with blood streaming down her face pushes the man away from the scene of the fight.

    The Unite the Right rally was being held at Emancipation Park and hundreds were seen stomping through the city, wearing militia uniforms, waving flags and chanting 'Blood and Soil' as they made their way towards the event.

    Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer denounced the 'cowardly parade of hatred, bigotry, racism, and intolerance march down the lawns of the architect of our Bill of Rights' and warned for residents to stay away from the rally.

    The Unite the Right rally was being held at Emancipation Park and hundreds were seen stomping through the city, wearing militia uniforms, waving flags and chanting 'Blood and Soil' as they made their way towards the event

    The Unite the Right rally was being held at Emancipation Park and hundreds were seen stomping through the city, wearing militia uniforms, waving flags and chanting 'Blood and Soil' as they made their way towards the event

    Several Nazi flags were seen proudly raised during the controversial rally protesting the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee

    Several Nazi flags were seen proudly raised during the controversial rally protesting the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee

    The Unite the Right rally was being held at Emancipation Park and hundreds were seen stomping through the city, wearing militia uniforms, waving flags and chanting 'Blood and Soil' as they made their way towards the event

    The Unite the Right rally was being held at Emancipation Park and hundreds were seen stomping through the city, wearing militia uniforms, waving flags and chanting 'Blood and Soil' as they made their way towards the event

    'The Charlottesville event could be a potentially historic showcase of hate, bringing together more extremists in one place than we have seen in at least a decade,' said Oren Segal They are protesting the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee

    'The Charlottesville event could be a potentially historic showcase of hate, bringing together more extremists in one place than we have seen in at least a decade,' said Oren Segal, director of the Center on Extremism at the Anti-Defamation League, a group that monitors and combats anti-Semitism 

    Still, counter-protesters flocked to the march in retaliation against the white nationalists neo-Confederates, and alt-right activists, screaming: 'We're here, we're gay, we fight the KKK!'

    A number of politicians have also taken to Twitter to condemn the white nationalists, calling their demonstration 'reprehensible' and 'repugnant'. 

    'The white nationalist demonstration in #Charlottesville is a reprehensible display of racism and hatred that has no place in our society,' tweeted Bernie Sanders. 

    'Our nation is defined by the march of progress. Our strength lies in our diversity. We must reject hate. #Charlottesville,' added Nancy Pelosi. 

    'The views fueling the spectacle in Charlottesville are repugnant,' Rep. Paul Ryan wrote. 'Let it only serve to unite Americans against this kind of vile bigotry.' 

    A number of politicians have also taken to Twitter to condemn the white nationalists, calling their demonstration 'reprehensible' and 'repugnant'

    A number of politicians have also taken to Twitter to condemn the white nationalists, calling their demonstration 'reprehensible' and 'repugnant'

    Meanwhile, Sen. Patrick Leahy criticized Trump's delay in condemning the demonstration

    Meanwhile, Sen. Patrick Leahy criticized Trump's delay in condemning the demonstration

    Former president Bill Clinton added that free speech was not akin to hate speech. 

    'Even as we protect free speech and assembly, we must condemn hatred, violence and white supremacy. #Charlottesville,' he tweeted. 

    Sen. Patrick Leahy criticized Trump's delay in condemning the demonstration. 

    'President Trump's silence as #Charlottesvile roils with racist and fascist provocation is shameful, irresponsible...and, DEFINING,' he wrote. 

    Unlike Trump, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Hucakbee wasn't afraid to condemn white nationalists. 

    "'White supremacy" crap is worst kind of racism - it's EVIL and perversion of God's truth to ever think our Creator values some above others,' he tweeted.  

    The protest hadn't officially started but social media videos showed the rally was escalating - people were seen throwing objects, breaking into fights and pepper spray being used, as officers watched from behind fences.

    The violence forced the city to declare a local emergency and determined the event was an unlawful assembly. Tear gas bombs to clear the unruly crowd.

    Arrests were made after police in riot gear attempted to clear the park and a group of protesters pushed back against them. However, the battle between the two opposing groups continued to rage in the streets of the city.

    Almost 200 white nationalists, neo-Confederates, and alt-right activists, heard chanting 'white lives matter' held burning torches

    Almost 200 white nationalists, neo-Confederates, and alt-right activists, heard chanting 'white lives matter' held burning torches

    Hundreds of white nationalists marched through the University of Virginia with burning torches on Friday

    Hundreds of white nationalists marched through the University of Virginia with burning torches on Friday

    Between 4,000 and 6,000 people from groups including white nationalists, neo-Confederates and alt-right activists were expected to protest at the park, which had recently been renamed from Lee Park.

    Right-wing blogger Jason Kessler planned what he called a 'pro-white' rally to protest Charlottesville's decision to remove a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

    U.S. District Judge Glen Conrad granted a preliminary injunction Friday in a lawsuit filed against Charlottesville by Kessler.

    Supporters and counter-protesters screamed, chanted, threw punches, hurled water bottles and unleashed chemical sprays on each other Saturday morning. Men dressed in militia uniforms were carrying shields and openly carrying long guns.

    'Jews will not replace us' and 'white lives matter' were among chants heard at the rally, according to witnesses

    'Jews will not replace us' and 'white lives matter' were among chants heard at the rally, according to witnesses

    One group of students were seen holding up a sign which read: 'VA students against white supremacists'

    One group of students were seen holding up a sign which read: 'VA students against white supremacists'

    Social media videos show the crowd throwing bottles and objects as police film the interaction from behind fences but don't intervene.

    Brawls broke out as people in militia gear tackled others to the ground and began throwing punches. 

    Kessler had led a torch lit procession through the University of Virginia campus on Friday night with burning torches, ending at the statue of Thomas Jefferson.

    Almost 200 white nationalists, neo-Confederates, and alt-right activists, were heard chanting 'white lives matter' and 'Jews will not replace us'.

    They clashed with University of Virginia students who held an anti-racist protest, and were seen holding up signs which read: 'VA students against white supremacists.' 

    A group of white activists clash with others at the Unite the Right Rally in Charlottesville on Saturday morning 

    A group of white activists clash with others at the Unite the Right Rally in Charlottesville on Saturday morning 

    Source : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4785008/Melania-Trump-condemns-violence-Charlottesville.html

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